Ken Brosky is an assistant professor of Creative Writing at UW-Rock County. His previous fiction publication was in Printer's Row Journal. In addition to his literary endeavors, he is also the author of The Grimm Chronicles, a Young Adult series. grendelguy@aol.com

Julie Dearborn lives in San Francisco and teaches English at an independent high school. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from Queens University of Charlotte. Her work has appeared in The Party Train: A Collection of North American Prose Poetry, Narrative Magazine, and other literary journals. When she is not teaching, writing, sleeping, or submitting, she can be found hiking the coastal trails, perusing the stacks in the Green Apple bookstore, or watching old movies in her rent-controlled apartment. juliedearborn@comcast.net

Katy Diana is a poet, freelancer, and business development writer from Philadelphia. Her work has been published in Apiary, Philadelphia Stories, Leveler, Grid Magazine, Northern Liberties Review, Broadkill Review, Blood Lotus, Mastodon Dentist, and other places. Katy was awarded the Dolman Prize for Creative Writing from Ursinus College and the Lantern Poetry Prize. She has studied under Philadelphia poets Leonard Gontarek and Alison Hicks, and interned with horror writer Jonathan Maberry. katy.diana@gmail.com

Doris Ferleger, winner of the New Letters Poetry Prize and the AROHO Creative Nonfiction Prize, among others, is the author of Big Silences in a Year of Rain, As the Moon Has Breath, and When You Become Snow. Her forthcoming book, Leavened, will be published in 2015. Her work has appeared in numerous journals. She holds an MFA in Poetry and a Ph.D. in psychology and maintains a mindfulness-based therapy practice in Wyncote, PA. dorlynn1@gmail.com

A native of southeastern Ohio, John Hazard now lives in Birmingham, Michigan. He has taught at the University of Memphis and more recently at the Cranbrook Schools and Oakland University in suburban Detroit. His poetry has appeared widely in magazines, including Ploughshares, Poetry, Shenandoah, Slate, and The Gettysburg Review. hazj@mac.com

Wendy Elizabeth Ingersoll is a retired piano teacher. Her book Grace Only Follows won the National Federation of Press Women Contest and was a finalist for Drake University's Emerging Writer Prize. She also has two chapbooks, both set in Chestertown MD. Her poems have appeared in such journals as Naugatuck River Review, Passager, Caesura, Controlled Burn, Mojave River Review, Delmarva Review, Broadkill Review, and others. wendyei7@verizon.net

Erin Murphy is the author of six books of poetry, most recently Ancilla (Lamar University Press, 2014), and is co-editor of Making Poems: Forty Poems with Commentary by the Poets (SUNY Press, 2010). Her works have been published in numerous journals and anthologies and featured on Garrison Keillor's The Writer's Almanac. She serves on the English and creative writing faculty at Penn State Altoona. www.erin-murphy.com

Jean Ryan, a native Vermonter, lives in Napa, California. Her stories and essays have appeared in a variety of journals. Nominated several times for a Pushcart Prize, she has also published a novel, Lost Sister. Her debut collection of short stories, Survival Skills, was published in April 2013 by Ashland Creek Press and was short-listed for a Lambda Literary Award. Her story "Manatee Gardens" appears in the anthology Outer Voices/Inner Lives. www.jean-ryan.com

Eugenie Juliet Theall completed her MFA in Poetry from Sarah Lawrence College and currently teaches creative writing and English. Her poetry has been published in Carquinez Poetry Review, Hawaii Pacific Review, Hampden-Sydney Poetry Review, and Silk Road, among others. Miss Theall's work also won first place in the Elizabeth McCormack/Inkwell contest. www.facebook.com/poeteugenietheall

Robert N. Watson is Distinguished Professor of English and Associate Dean of Humanities at UCLA. He the author of several books about English Renaissance literature, including the multiple-prize-winning Back to Nature, and his poems have appeared in The New Yorker, where his mother's poetry was published half a century ago, and in twenty other literary journals. rnwatson@humnet.ucla.edu